Pisaurina mira
(Nursery Web Spider)

Taxonomic Hierarchy

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Suborder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Pisauridae
  • Genus: Pisaurina
  • Species: Pisaurina mira

Common Name (AASMore information icon)

Nursery Web Spider

Author

Charles Athanase Walckenaer, 1837

Pronunciation

py-sawr-EYE-nuh MEE-ruh

Identification Traits

Disclaimer: The following table provides a quick overview of the spider's basic attributes. The physical traits are greatly generalized in order to aid in the identification and sorting of spider species using our search feature. This information is not exhaustive, and keep in mind that traits such as color, markings, and overall size and shape can vary widely within a species due to variables such as the spider's age, gender, diet, hydration level, climate, and habitat. Though experienced arachnologists and hobbyists can often classify spiders rather accurately based on their unique markings and general appearance, it's important to know that scientifically accurate spider identification relies on detailed taxonomic keys and microscopic examinations of a spider's reproductive organs.

Female iconFemale Male iconMale
Body size More information icon 12mm - 17mm 10mm - 15mm
Eye count 8
Primary Colors
Identifying Traits Fuzzy or hairy appearance, Cylindrical or elongated body, Lengthwise stripe(s), Visible spines on legs, Legs solid color, Especially long legs
Web style Nursery web only


Additional Remarks

  • Has at least six distinct color/pattern variations, which can make the species more difficult for the average person to identify. One of the most unique variations is mostly all pale with a thin, dark brown line down the center of the body and dark brown bands at the leg joints: it’s been referred to as the “subinflata variation” (Bishop 1924).
  • May be one of the most common spiders in eastern North America (as reported by Carico 1972).
  • Frequently mistaken for a “wolf spider” of the family Lycosidae, but the eye arrangements are vastly different.
  • Egg sac is a whitish sphere, about 15mm in diameter, carried in the female’s chelicerae (jaws); she hangs it in a “nursery web” when the babies are ready to emerge and then guards them until they’ve dispersed.

Featured Pictures

Picture of Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider) - Dorsal Enlarge picture icon
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Picture of Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider) - Dorsal Enlarge picture icon
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Picture of Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider) - Female - Dorsal Enlarge picture icon
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Picture of Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider) - Female - Dorsal Enlarge picture icon
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Picture of Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider) - Female - Dorsal,Gravid Enlarge picture icon
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Picture of Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider) - Female Enlarge picture icon
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Picture of Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider) - Male - Ventral Enlarge picture icon
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Picture of Pisaurina mira (Nursery Web Spider) - Male - Lateral Enlarge picture icon
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